Blending journalism and ethnography. Part I: The slow and the new

There is a small but also an interesting study field about the relationship between journalism and ethnography (Cramer & McDevitt, 2014Hermann, 2014) where some scholars have contributed, to a greater extent, to discuss the possibilities and advantages of including ethnography in journalistic work. It is mainly in this way: ethnography—>journalism. The aim of this growing line of knowledge is, thus, how to improve journalism through the implementation of an ethnographical ethos into the daily practice of journalism.

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Generalities about particular cases

if we want to be on the sidelines of totalitarian points of view, we need to use relativity and a particular and located vision.

To talk about relativity results problematic nowadays due to the possible relationship that could be traced between relativism and postmodernism, interpreting the first one into the frame of the second one. However, relativity, as we will see below, is nothing more than a fundamental scientific attitude to approach reality. 

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The Columbus Syndrome

…And an introduction to radical ethnography.

Why did I decide to do ethnography? Well, I decided to do ethnography because I consider that through an ethnographical work I can first, (1) follow the trajectories of the objects I am interested in, (2) using any kind of resources from any side, and (3) without a determined disciplinary, theoretical frame or preconception. Second, ethnography allows me to create and to represent better descriptions of those trajectories. Here, ethnography is not categorized as a tool from other disciplines, such as anthropology or sociology.

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