Walking as a way of thinking. Part one

There are two different strategies I use to apply for developing epistemic devices and multimodal artifacts: the first one is going to walk with the concepts and ideas I am currently working with. The second one is taking a nap with them. Today, I will talk about the first one. 

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Blending journalism and ethnography. Part I: The slow and the new

There is a small but also an interesting study field about the relationship between journalism and ethnography (Cramer & McDevitt, 2014Hermann, 2014) where some scholars have contributed, to a greater extent, to discuss the possibilities and advantages of including ethnography in journalistic work. It is mainly in this way: ethnography—>journalism. The aim of this growing line of knowledge is, thus, how to improve journalism through the implementation of an ethnographical ethos into the daily practice of journalism.

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What is an urban experiment? Presenting the “Green Light for Midtown” program

In general terms, an experiment is something that you do for either validate or reject a hypothesis. That something is an organized and controlled procedure that should be able to be replicated in a similar scenario following a specific set of instructions. But experiment is not an easy concept. When we talk about doing an experiment we have to put generalizations away and going to to the specific. There are different magnitudes, levels, and logics involved in an experimental process, some of them are even challenging the general definition of this particular notion.

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Baklavas in Mauerpark

Every time I am reading something, I cannot stop comparing my way of writing with other people’s work. But how I do that is paying special attention to the way how they are knitting their set of concepts. I always find interesting the fluency the rest of the word has for using theoretical notions. The confidence they have for naming things is something I won’t ever have.

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Decomposing the front yard of a library. Some thoughts about territory and territorialization (I)

Many years ago, when I still lived in the metropolitan area of Medellin, I was a punk. As a member of that subculture, I used to go with my punk friends to punk places. One of those places was a library. Well, the outside patio of the library: a big brightly and made of cement area near cheap places for buying beer. Every weekend was the same. After nine pm we used to meet there until sunrise, more or less. Around us, other groups of punks were doing the same. Mostly, each subgroup formed by a local punk band and its close friends. From time to time people used to move from a group to another. In general terms, everyone knew to everyone, and despite some disputes and rivalries, the ambient there was quiet (under the standards of, more or less, seventy punks sharing a space.

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The Columbus Syndrome

…And an introduction to radical ethnography.

Why did I decide to do ethnography? Well, I decided to do ethnography because I consider that through an ethnographical work I can first, (1) follow the trajectories of the objects I am interested in, (2) using any kind of resources from any side, and (3) without a determined disciplinary, theoretical frame or preconception. Second, ethnography allows me to create and to represent better descriptions of those trajectories. Here, ethnography is not categorized as a tool from other disciplines, such as anthropology or sociology.

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