Blending journalism and ethnography. Part I: The slow and the new

There is a small but also an interesting study field about the relationship between journalism and ethnography (Cramer & McDevitt, 2014Hermann, 2014) where some scholars have contributed, to a greater extent, to discuss the possibilities and advantages of including ethnography in journalistic work. It is mainly in this way: ethnography—>journalism. The aim of this growing line of knowledge is, thus, how to improve journalism through the implementation of an ethnographical ethos into the daily practice of journalism.

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Traveling light, an epistemological promise

How can we close the gap between reality and theory? How can we explain a reality that is fluent and that is always changing when the theoretical constructions we use for it are going slower than the world outside? Those questions were proposed by Hugo Zemelman (2012) in a paper about epistemic thinking. 

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The Columbus Syndrome

…And an introduction to radical ethnography.

Why did I decide to do ethnography? Well, I decided to do ethnography because I consider that through an ethnographical work I can first, (1) follow the trajectories of the objects I am interested in, (2) using any kind of resources from any side, and (3) without a determined disciplinary, theoretical frame or preconception. Second, ethnography allows me to create and to represent better descriptions of those trajectories. Here, ethnography is not categorized as a tool from other disciplines, such as anthropology or sociology.

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Lights still on

It was almost midnight, and the air was unusually cold due to some sporadic showers during the night. I was seated on a concrete bench in front of an empty and under remodeling spot between Broadway Avenue and W. 47th Street. After midnight, when the area is less transited, a group of workers starts its shift that consists in adapting and restyling the bare commercial place for a new branch of Swarovski. During the day, the construction remains closed. However, at nights, and despite the work is carried out inside, one can see from the sidewalk the lights and sparks going out of the welding machine, as well as the men doing their handiwork. 

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